Richmond, Indiana Attorney for Bankruptcy Considers Jobs Picture From the Other Side

September 4, 2013 1:25 pm Published by

There’s always another side to the story, I’ve learned. Earlier this week, I was delighted to report a lot of good news about growing job opportunities in Indiana, especially in the auto industry and in healthcare. I reminded my Bankruptcy in Indiana readers how crucial a tie there is between personal bankruptcy and the availability of regular, reliable personal income from jobs.

Take divorce, for example. As every one of the good Indiana bankruptcy lawyers who works with me well knows, divorce is one of the three leading causes of bankruptcy in Indiana. Without a good job, a parent cannot keep up with child support obligations. Without a good job, now single moms (the majority of whom are not receiving the support payments provided for in their divorce decrees), have trouble keeping their kids fed and clothed.

That’s why, as a longtime debt consolidation lawyer here in Indiana, I’m so thrilled when I have good news to report about jobs coming to our state. The other side of the story, though, is that we have a long, long way to go.  Brian Howey of nwi.com reminds us that “after 16 consecutive months of Indiana’s jobless rate above the national average – it’s 8.4 percent now, compared to 7.4 for the U.S. – the cold reality is that we have a problem with a quarter of a million Hoosiers chronically out of work.”

Now, Indiana bankruptcy is a truly powerful tool for getting relief from financial woes, because it gives you the chance to make a fresh financial start. Bankruptcy is meant to give financially overwhelmed consumers a new lease on life. It's our society's safety net, a safety net our Congress created for "honest but unfortunate debtors".

The problem is (and we wrestle with this problem every day at the Zuckerberg bankruptcy law offices), the safety net just can’t work without income from jobs.  And, while I demonstrated earlier this week that job markets are looking rosier and much improvement is likely to happen in the next two years, it’s not happening fast enough for many, many Hoosiers.
 

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This post was written by Mark Zuckerberg

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